THE CHEROKEES
That's If You Want Me To
(Ron Elliott)
Australia 1965
#7 Melbourne #40 Perth

Single on Go!!!, released around November 1965.

The Cherokees were an adaptable Melbourne band whose career ranged from Shadows-style instrumentals to comic jugband revivals, with variations along the way. 

For a wider view of The Cherokees' history 1961-67 see the earlier instrumental single Moon In The Afternoon (1964)

Cherokees guitarist Pete 'Rattlebone' Tindal, now in the UK, runs Bluesola Music. Its website includes a section featuring the The Cherokees' music and history as well as Pete's own solo recordings.

Suggestion from Terry Stacey.

THE BEAU BRUMMELS
That's, If You Want Me To
(Ron Elliott)
USA 1965
Original version

The title has a comma, omitted on the Australian cover version.

On Autumn LP Introducing The Beau Brummels, April 1965, by San Francisco band that successfully adapted the sounds of the British Invasion. They were produced by Sylvester "Sly Stone" Stewart, later of Sly & The Family Stone.

Of the album's 12 tracks, 9 were written by Beau Brummels foundation member, lead guitarist and arranger Ron Elliott. He co-wrote Just A Little, their biggest hit (1965, #8 USA) included on the album. An earlier charting single Laugh, Laugh (1965, #15) is also there.

That's, If You Want Me To was also on a Disques Vogue EP Just A Little (France, 1965).

Further reading: Beau Brummels biography by Richie Unterberger and Ron Elliott biography by Bruce Eder at All Music.

THE PERSIANS
That's If You Want Me To
(Sammy Turner)
USA 1968
Red herring

SAME TITLE BUT NOT THE SAME SONG AS
'THAT'S IF YOU WANT ME TO' BY THE CHEROKEES.

Single on ABC by Baltimore vocal quintet. YouTube

Turbans... and hard passionate singing were the group's trademarks (Andrew Hamilton, Persians biography, All Music).

GEORGE HAMILTON IV
If You Want Me To
(Roger Miller)
USA 1962
Red herring

SIMILAR TITLE BUT NOT THE SAME SONG AS
'THAT'S IF YOU WANT ME TO' BY THE CHEROKEES.

B-side on RCA Victor YouTube  

In Australia If You Want Me To was the A-side, which might explain why it is so familiar to me from Australian radio. It wasn't a hit, but it did spend some time at #1 on the Country And Western Hit Parade that 2UE Sydney printed beneath its Top 40 chart.

Written by Roger Miller who later included it on his debut album Roger And Out (1964) and released it as a single (1965).

Corrections or comments? Contact the writer.